Monday, January 4, 2016

The Great Lakes Re-invent- Part II- future is bright for the fish we love!


In my last blog, I talked of  a re-invent challenge from a perception that needs to take place and  that has steered the way we approach and operate our Great Lakes magnificent resource. 


We still have a magnificent world class trout, salmon and steelhead fishery that other places in the world would die for! But, we have to encompass biological change now that it is ever so fast and alarming as biological ecosystem changes coincide with climate change, further complicated the evolving changes in the ecosystem.

After speaking with Chuck Madenjian at the USGS about the excellent article link below, we do not have the absolute certainty that a 'once a year sampling on a massive body of water' will be the 'total canary in the coal mine, only an educated prognosis of what is occurring at that moment- in that location. "The current 2015 year class of alewives is strong he said. But will the strong "predator pit" of heavy salmon predation keep the population down is the big million dollar question". These 'data surveys' are very good indicators but have been proven to be wrong in the long run over the decades and marveled even Chuck as to 'where the hell did those alewives come from out of surprise'- saw it happen in the decade of 2001-009.

In my only conclusion, it is time to re-invent in the Great Lakes my friends. The future lies heavily and burns bright for the magnificent fish we love- steelhead, brown trout and Atlantic salmon- even coho's!, all being multi foraging species that don't have to have alewives .These secondary predators, not like alpha food chain dominant species like King Chinook salmon. are 65/35% multi-prey balanced species predating on every macro /micro vertebrate and invertebrate they can find. The future is bright for these fish that will eventually dominate the fishery as long as they receive the protection they need. Remember, steelhead and browns were successful in establishing wild (wild doesn't mean native) populations in the Great Lakes back in the late 1800's. 

BOTTOM LINE- GET OUT AND FISH, ENJOY THE AMAZING RESOURCE WE HAVE- THERE WILL BE GOOD DAYS AND BAD- BUT IN THE END IT IS ALL WHAT WE MAKE IT!- NUMBERS MEAN NOTHING!, IT'S HOW WE APPRECIATE THE LITTLE THINGS THAT WE ARE STILL SO FORTUNATE TO HAVE. CHILL!
Here is one more excellent link to think off when you head out on the water again from my freind Martin in Denmark